< FYI

10 Best TV Shows on Netflix

10 Best TV Shows on Netflix

FYI

Our list of what to watch on Netflix is here to help you find the next TV series to devour, and we have looked through the enormous catalog to find these recommendations. If you have ever wondered “what should I watch on Netflix?” You have come to the right place.

1. Stranger Things
If you have not watched the cult phenomenon that is Stranger Things, you need to stop what you are doing and start right now. It would be a disservice to yourself and the Netflix-loving community not to watch this sci-fi phenomenon.

The plot centres on a group of kids in the 80's, who use walkie-talkie's to communicate with each other, play Dungeons and Dragons and just so happen to uncover massive government supernatural conspiracies. It has a host of truly iconic characters and a plot filled with genuine intrigue and emotional depth. It has humour and horror balanced to a fine art, especially considering there are only 8 episodes on season 1 and 9 episodes on season 2.

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2. 13 Reasons Why
13 Reasons Why is an American mystery teen drama web television series based on the 2007 novel Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher and adapted by Brian Yorkey for Netflix. The series revolves around a high school student, Clay Jensen, and his friend Hannah Baker, a girl who takes her own life after suffering a series of demoralizing circumstances brought on by select individuals at her school. A box of cassette tapes recorded by Hannah before her suicide details thirteen reasons why she ended her life.


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Teenager Clay Jensen returns home from school one day to find a mysterious box lying on his porch. Inside, he discovers seven double-sided cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker, his classmate and unrequited love, who tragically took her own life two weeks earlier.

On the tapes, Hannah unfolds an emotional audio diary, detailing the thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Her instructions are clear, each person who receives the package is one of the reasons why she killed herself. After each person finishes listening to the tapes, they must pass the package on to the next person. If anyone breaks the chain, a separate set of tapes will be released to the public. Each tape is addressed to a select person in her school, and details their involvement in her eventual suicide.

3. Chef’s Table
Chef's Table is an American documentary web series released on Netflix. Each episode of the series profiles a single world-renowned chef. Creator David Gelb considers it a follow-up to his critically acclaimed documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi.

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4. Orange Is The New Black
Orange is the New Black is perfectly suited for the Netflix delivery system, if only because it would have been agonizing to wait a week for a new episode. But there’s more the construct felt cinematic and compared to your average show, and we could not help but feel that the all-at-once release plane freed the creators to make something less episodic and more free-flowing.

Taylor Schilling stars as Piper Chapman, a woman living a content modern life when her past rears up suddenly to tackle her from behind. A decade earlier, she was briefly a drug mule for her lover Alex Vause (the excellent Laura Prepon), and when Vause needed to plea her sentence down, she gave up Piper.

The story is based on the real-life events of Piper Kerman, whose book of the same title was the inspiration, but the truth is that the screen version is miles better. Schilling is the engine that drives the plot, and her odd combination of natural serenity mixed with the increasing anger and desperation at the late turn her life has taken strikes the perfect tone for life inside the women’s prison.

Over the first few episodes, prison is treated like an almost-quirky novelty she will have to experience for 15 months, and the wisest choice director Jenji Kohan made (and there are many) was to heighten the stakes so that what begins as an off-kilter adventure soon takes on the serious proportions prison life demands.

And as great as Schilling and Prepon are together, the supporting cast is so universally excellent that it almost beggars belief. There are too many characters who make gold with their limited screen time to mention individually, but suffice it to say that there’s enough comedy, pathos and tragedy here for a dozen shows. The fact that they fit so successfully into one makes OITNB a defining triumph for Netflix.


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5. The Defenders
Marvel's The Defenders, or simply The Defenders, is an American web television miniseries created by Douglas Petrie and Marco Ramirez for Netflix, based on the Marvel Comics characters Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage and Iron Fist, who form the eponymous superhero team. It is set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), sharing continuity with the films of the franchise and is the culmination of a series of interconnected shows from Marvel and Netflix.

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Set a few months after the events of the second season of Daredevil, and a month after the events of the first season of Iron Fist, the vigilantes Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist team up in New York City to fight a common enemy, the Hand.

6. Master of None
When Dev Shah closes his eyes and looks into his future, all he sees is black. As a 30-something living in New York City, trying to navigate pop culture references and complicated personal relationships, Dev is refreshingly real. Aziz Ansari writes and stars, creating a humorous and sometimes painfully honest look into modern life – taking on everything from dating apps, cultural stereotyping and the overarching question 'what do I want?' The second season pays homage to Italian cinema, with stunning visuals and a plot that's not afraid to reject cliche. It's a strong contender amidst Netflix's comedy offerings.

 

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The show is fun to watch, emotionally satisfying and thought provoking. Unlike anything else on television, Master of None is not only one of the best shows of Netflix, but one of the most important in a long, long time.

7. A Series Of Unfortunate Events
Director Barry Sonnenfeld, Neil Patrick Harris as the evil Count Olaf, and Handler himself (as screenwriter) rose to the challenge magnificently. The Series, whose first season contains eight out of a planned 26 episodes, does not consistently hit the emotional heights of Netflix’s best fare, but it more than makes up for this paucity with solid acting, abundant wit and a visual aesthetic that is wholly unique in television—a hybrid of Tim Burton’s gothic glee and Wes Anderson’s diorama cinema. Book-readers will delight at the faithfulness of the adaptation, and while first-timers may take a tad longer to get their feet wet, the colorful menagerie of characters and the dogged perseverance of the Baudelaire orphans should win them over. 

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8. Santa Clarita Diet
Santa Clarita Diet is an American horror-comedy web television series created by Victor Fresco, starring Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant.

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Joel and Sheila Hammond are everyday suburban real estate agents in Santa Clarita, California. The couple face a series of obstacles when Sheila has a physical transformation into a zombie and starts craving human flesh. With Joel and the family trying to help Sheila through the trying time, they have to deal with neighbors, cultural norms and getting to the bottom of a potentially mythological mystery.

9. Black Mirror
There are probably times in most of our lives when we see our technological world as more of a dystopia than a utopia. The way it curbs our freedom, diminishes our privacy, and subjects us to anonymous attacks can feel like an unforgivable violation.

But the worst part is, we’re complicit—we have accepted the intrusion, and in most cases, we have become addicted. The ubiquity of technology is a reality that we can’t fight against, and to maintain our sanity, we have to accept it.

But that doesn’t mean it’s not worth questioning, which is exactly what Black Mirroris all about. The title is nearly perfect, as explained by creator Charlie Brooker, the black mirror of the title is the one you will find on every wall, on every desk, in the palm of every hand, the cold, shiny screen of a TV, a monitor, a smartphone.

The job of this show is to reflect our society in an unflattering light, and they do it with a new cast and a new story in each episode. This is not fun watching—it’s mostly horrifying—but even if our brave new world is inescapable, the show represents a kind of protest that feels more necessary than ever.

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10. Gilmore Girls
The original show is now a distant and beloved memory. The joy of discovering it for the first time! Lorelai (Lauren Graham), her daughter Rory (Alexis Bledel) and family matriarch Emily (the incomparable Kelly Bishop) honestly portray three generations of strong women. It’s the only show you can watch with your teenage daughter and your mother and be assured you will all be equally entertained.

In addition to the deft storytelling, there’s the never before or since matched rat-a-tat banter and pop-culture references that infuse all the dialogue. And the love stories! Lorelai and Luke (Scott Patterson) are one of TV’s greatest love stories.

 
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